Linux type command

The type command in Linux is used to determine the type of a command or a shell construct. It helps you identify whether a given command is a built-in shell command, an alias, a function, or an executable file.

Here’s an overview of how to use the type command:

  1. Basic Usage:
    To determine the type of a command, simply type type followed by the command name. For example:
   type ls

This command will display information about the ls command, indicating its type.

  1. Displaying Command Type:
    The type command will provide output indicating the type of the command. It may show one of the following types:
  • alias: If the command is an alias defined in your shell configuration.
  • keyword: If the command is a shell keyword or reserved word.
  • function: If the command is a shell function defined in your shell configuration.
  • builtin: If the command is a built-in shell command.
  • file: If the command is an executable file located in the system’s executable path.
  1. Examples:
  • Checking if a command is an alias: type ll This command will display information about the ll command and indicate if it is an alias.
  • Determining the type of a built-in shell command: type cd This command will display information about the cd command and indicate that it is a built-in shell command.
  • Identifying the type of a user-defined function: type my_function This command will display information about the my_function function if it is defined in your shell configuration.
  • Checking the type of an executable file:
    type grep
    This command will display information about the grep command and indicate that it is an executable file located in the system’s executable path.

The type command is helpful for understanding the origin and behavior of commands in your shell environment. It allows you to identify whether a command is a built-in, an alias, a function, or an executable file.

For more information about the type command and its options, you can refer to the manual page by typing man type in your terminal.